Who was good Sparta or Athens?

Who was better Sparta or Athens?

Sparta is far superior to Athens because their army was fierce and protective, girls received some education and women had more freedom than in other poleis. First, the army of Sparta was the strongest fighting force in Greece. … The Spartans believed this made them strong and better mothers.

Did Athens beat Sparta?

Athens lost its dominance in the region to Sparta until both were conquered less than a century later and made part of the kingdom of Macedon.

Who had more freedom Sparta or Athens?

When comparing their systems of governance and personal liberties, it is clear that the citizens of Athens possessed the broadest level of freedom and the citizens of Sparta possessed the most absolute freedom.

Did Athens have slaves?

Slaves were the lowest class in Athenian society, but according to many contemporary accounts they were far less harshly treated than in most other Greek cities. … Lowest of all slaves were those who worked in the nearby Laurium silver mines – where most quickly perished.

Did Spartans throw babies off cliffs?

The Greek myth that ancient Spartans threw their stunted and sickly newborns off a cliff was not corroborated by archaeological digs in the area, researchers said Monday. … “It is probably a myth, the ancient sources of this so-called practice were rare, late and imprecise,” he added.

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Why did Sparta Not Destroy Athens?

Like the Athenians before the war, the Spartans believed in rule by force rather than cooperation. … Sparta, however, had another motive for sparing Athens: they feared that a destroyed Athens would add to the growth in influence of Thebes, just north of Athens.

Who defeated Sparta?

A large Macedonian army under general Antipater marched to its relief and defeated the Spartan-led force in a pitched battle. More than 5,300 of the Spartans and their allies were killed in battle, and 3,500 of Antipater’s troops.

Why did Athens and Sparta go to war?

The primary causes were that Sparta feared the growing power and influence of the Athenian Empire. The Peloponnesian war began after the Persian Wars ended in 449 BCE. … This disagreement led to friction and eventually outright war. Additionally, Athens and its ambitions caused increasing instability in Greece.